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Audiences

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Censorship in Media

John Safran discusses censorship in Australian media.

From the website From Wireless to Web

The Ratings War

The ruthless world of commercial television and its chase for ratings is compared to the programming motivations of the public broadcaster.

From the website From Wireless to Web

Australian Biography

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Andrew Fisher’s Lunch Box

Andrew Fisher’s tin lunch box reminds us that humble beginnings informed his political career: he went from union organiser to three-time Prime Minister, inventing the Australian ideal of a ‘fair go’ along the way.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

Edmund Barton and the Velvet Soap Advertisement

The Velvet Soap advertising campaign is a tongue-in-cheek reminder of Edmund Barton’s hand in formulating the White Australia policy.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

William Hughes and the 1916 Conscription Badge

William Hughes, “The Little Digger”, campaigned twice for national conscription to boost an Australian army decimated by World War One.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

Ben Chifley’s Pipe

Possibly our best loved Prime Minister, and a former train driver, Ben Chifley was rarely seen without his pipe, as he guided the country through the austere post-war years.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

Stanley Melbourne Bruce's Cigarette Case

Stanley Melbourne Bruce treasured Turkish President Mustafa Kemal Atatürk’s gift of a gold cigarette case throughout his life.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

John Curtin’s Australian Journalists’ Association Badge

John Curtin’s journalistic instincts came in handy during World War Two when he kept the media onside with secret press briefings. He wore his AJA badge every day he was in office.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

Joseph Lyons’ Love Letters

Politics rarely produces impassioned romantics, which makes the hundreds of letters Joseph Lyons wrote to his adored wife and confidante, Enid, as fascinating as they are unexpected

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

Robert Menzies’ Camera

Robert Menzies’ lifelong passion for home movies resulted in a surprisingly personal record of the war years, including footage of a young Princess Elizabeth.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

Harold Holt’s Briefcase

The disappearance of our seventeenth Prime Minister, Harold Holt, during a beach holiday sparked countless conspiracy theories. The items left in his briefcase are a significant time capsule of his last days as Prime Minister.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

James Scullin And The GCMG

James Scullin inspired the people when he offered to rent out The Lodge during the Depression, but his fierce nationalism is best revealed in his campaign to install an Australian-born Governor General.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

Australian icons

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The Sentimental Bloke Film

The classic 1919 silent movie <cite>The Sentimental Bloke</cite> is regarded as one of the greatest Australian films.

From the website National Treasures

Waltzing Matilda Song Sheet

The original handwritten score for <cite>Waltzing Matilda</cite> holds the story of a musical collaboration that created Australia’s national song.

From the website National Treasures

Australian media organisations

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Tuning in to the ABC

The archival clip shows the ABC network as it was in the 1955. Tim Bowden reflects on the power of ABC broadcasts to unify states and cities across Australia.

From the website From Wireless to Web

Australians at War

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Bruce Dawe - Anti War Poet

This encounter with highly regarded Australian poet Bruce Dawe allows us an insight into the motivation and methods of a very fine writer. His ability to express the drama and beauty of everyday life has made his work readily accessible to the general public.

From the website Australian Biography

Bruce Dawe - Anti War Poet

This encounter with highly regarded Australian poet Bruce Dawe allows us an insight into the motivation and methods of a very fine writer. His ability to express the drama and beauty of everyday life has made his work readily accessible to the general public.

From the website Australian Biography

Stanley Melbourne Bruce's Cigarette Case

Stanley Melbourne Bruce treasured Turkish President Mustafa Kemal Atatürk’s gift of a gold cigarette case throughout his life.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

Australian television

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Aussie-made content

Australian film and television production is competing in a globalised world with big international production companies who market their product effectively to the world market.

From the website From Wireless to Web

Australian television drama

Australian content on television reflects our culture and our society. Mac Gudgeon celebrates the importance of <cite>Homicide</cite> in the history of Australian television production. Stuart Cunningham and Scott Goodings remember some of the popular dramas which showed Australians that they could love Australian programming.

From the website From Wireless to Web

Launch of TV

Liz Jacka provides a brief history of the debate on how to establish television broadcasting in Australia. Tim Bowden recalls the enthusiasm with which Australians embraced television.

From the website From Wireless to Web

TV Soap Opera

TV soap operas have the ability to reflect Australian society and culture and connect people through the shared memory of watching a television show.

From the website From Wireless to Web

Community TV

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Community TV

The role of community television in general and its role in training TV personalities.

From the website From Wireless to Web

Documentaries

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Captain Cook - James Cook Joins the Navy

Influential patrons help the bright boy James Cook to an apprenticeship in the merchant navy that would make him a ships’ master. But with an eye for the main chance Cook switches to the Royal Navy.

From the website Captain Cook

Captain Cook - Cook Claims New South Wales

After spending some time observing an Aboriginal tribe, Cook commits the most controversial act of the voyage: he claims the entire east coast of New Holland for Britain, without permission from the local inhabitants.

From the website Captain Cook

Captain Cook’s Tragic Death

Captain James Cook’s untimely return to Hawaii ended with his violent death, the details of which are portrayed in numerous conflicting illustrations.

From the website Hidden Treasures – Inside the National Library of Australia

Captain Cook - In Search of the North West Passage

Cook’s obsession with discovery continues as he searches for the mythic North West Passage, but is it a journey too far? Now retired and promoted to Post Captain, James Cook is bored. He jumps at the chance to take on a third great voyage: to find a fast route to China to secure Britain’s place in the lucrative tea trade.

From the website Captain Cook

Captain Cook - Great Southern Continent

In his first great voyage of discovery, James Cook is chosen to find and explore the 'Great Southern Land'.

From the website Captain Cook

Captain Cook - Cook's Chronometer

On James Cook’s second voyage of discovery he takes part in a grand scientific experiment to test a chronometer that the Admiralty hopes will allow navigators to measure lines of longitude.

From the website Captain Cook

Who Killed Dr Bogle & Mrs Chandler?

One of crime history's great unsolved cases - the mysterious deaths of Dr Bogle and Mrs Chandler.

From the website DIY DOCO

Cane Toads

This humorous program takes a close look at Australia’s Cane Toad pest problem.

From the website DIY DOCO

The Last Great Amateurs

We follow the Melbourne Phoenix Netball Club - the players, coach and administrators - through the pain and passion of a year in elite-level amateur sport.

From the website DIY DOCO

Rare Chicken Rescue

After a long battle with depression, Queensland rare chicken breeder Mark Tully is now on a mission to protect the endangered chickens to which he owes his life.

From the website DIY DOCO

Under One Roof - The Chakos Family

Come and have dinner with the Chakos family – four generations of Greek Australians with a love of life, celebration, ritual and food.

From the website DIY DOCO

Menace

A post World War Two propaganda film warning of the threat to Australian democracy posed by the communist menace.

From the website DIY DOCO

Engaging with Asia

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In a 21st century call centre, India.

In an Indian call centre, graduates, keen for employment, learn how to communicate globally with diverse clients from the USA, Australia and the UK.

From the website Screen Asia

Call centre ethics

Customer queries are often secretly diverted to Delhi call centres, where Indians are taught to speak and think like their American, British and Australian callers.

From the website Screen Asia

An 'Australian Culture Capsule'

A teacher at a call centre college in India takes students through some general knowledge about 'Downunder Australia'.

From the website Screen Asia

Call centres and cultural identity

The training program for employees at a call centre in India and the protocols and procedures they must follow.

From the website Screen Asia

Two fathers, two mothers - one child

The effects of Australia’s role in the mass adoption of Vietnamese babies during the fall of Saigon, Vietnam, in 1975.

From the website Screen Asia

Taslima Nasrin - Bangladeshi doctor, poet and refugee

The Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin recounts her 1960s childhood and her awakening to women's oppression.

From the website Screen Asia

Taslima Nasrin - the price of freedom

Bangladeshi poet Taslima Nasrin reflects about her mother’s life and her own responsibility, through her writing, to changing the lives of women globally.

From the website Screen Asia

Choosing who you want to be

The effects of Australia’s role in the mass adoption of Vietnamese babies during the fall of Saigon, Vietnam, in 1975.

From the website Screen Asia

Kids are never yours forever – they're on loan

The effects of Australia’s role in the mass adoption of Vietnamese babies during the fall of Saigon in Vietnam, in 1975.

From the website Screen Asia

From Saigon to Perth - a Vietnam War orphan

Surfie Shane is at Yallingup beach in Western Australia where he lives. Shane was one of the babies adopted through the ‘Operation Babylift’ airlift from Saigon, Vietnam, in 1975.

From the website Screen Asia

Intercountry adoption and cultural identity

Shane Bolt was one of 281 children airlifted out of Saigon in April 1975 at the end of the Vietnam War and brought to Australia. He was adopted by a Western Australian family. Shane’s Australian mother, Frea, remembers how the family fought anti-Asian sentiment in Perth.

From the website Screen Asia

An 'Operation Babylift' baby grows up

Shane Bolt is at Yallingup beach, Western Australia, and reflects on the good fortune of his life, family and culture.

From the website Screen Asia

Meet Professor Huong of Hanoi

Professor Huong, a cellist, was a member of the Hanoi Symphony Orchestra in the 1960s during the Vietnam War. He survived the war by hiding in an underground refuge in rural village near Hanoi.

From the website Screen Asia

Vietnam Symphony - an underground symphony family

Tuan observes that his father’s reunion with the Xuan Phu villagers is just like a family reunion. His father was a cellist in the Hanoi Symphony Orchestra that took refuge in the village during the Vietnam War.

From the website Screen Asia

Life in modern Hanoi

Four generations of Professor Huong’s family share a meal. The professor is concerned that his son, Tuan, will not follow his profession in classical music.

From the website Screen Asia

Two birthdays, two names and one child

The effects of Australia’s role in the mass adoption of Vietnamese babies during the fall of Saigon, Vietnam, in 1975.

From the website Screen Asia

Gender issues

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William Hughes and the 1916 Conscription Badge

William Hughes, “The Little Digger”, campaigned twice for national conscription to boost an Australian army decimated by World War One.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

Genre

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Reality TV

An excerpt from a live 'eviction' episode of the popular reality TV series <cite>Big Brother</cite>. Scott Goodings describes his experience of watching reality TV.

From the website From Wireless to Web

Great Depression

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Bruce Dawe Reads "Little Red Fox"

Bruce Dawe reads his poem "Little Red Fox". This encounter with highly regarded Australian poet Bruce Dawe allows us an insight into the motivation and methods of a very fine writer. His ability to express the drama and beauty of everyday life has made his work readily accessible to the general public.

From the website Australian Biography

Identity

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Cuc Lam's Suitcase

It may be just a small red vinyl suitcase but for Vietnamese refugee Cuc Lam it’s a symbol of a new beginning in a new country.

From the website National Treasures

James Scullin And The GCMG

James Scullin inspired the people when he offered to rent out The Lodge during the Depression, but his fierce nationalism is best revealed in his campaign to install an Australian-born Governor General.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

Trade Routes

Australian ‘prehistory’ is the time before written language was used to record information. Culture was passed from one group to another, and from one generation to the next, in oral form, ceremonial dance, and through rock and bark visual art.

From the website First Australians

Oodgeroo Noonuccal

Writer and political activist Oodgeroo Noonuccal’s poetry represents and captures the growing reaction by a new generation of indigenous Australians against the long-standing colonial mentality.

From the website First Australians

Indigenous broadcasting

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CAAMA & Indigenous Broadcasting

A broadcast studio at Radio Redfern in the late 80s. Christina Spurgeon talks about the importance of providing media services to remote Indigenous communities to the culture, identity and language of Aboriginal Australians.

From the website From Wireless to Web

multi-modal texts

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Blogging

Blogging can be used as a means of pursuing a cause.

From the website From Wireless to Web

The Education Machine

When it comes to the education system, have accounting and information replaced wonder and imagination?

From the website Human Contraptions

Newsreels

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Newsreels before sound

Newsreels included events of both political and social importance and were screened all day long in specially designed cinemas.

From the website From Wireless to Web

Poetry

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Bruce Dawe - Anti War Poet

This encounter with highly regarded Australian poet Bruce Dawe allows us an insight into the motivation and methods of a very fine writer. His ability to express the drama and beauty of everyday life has made his work readily accessible to the general public.

From the website Australian Biography

Radio in Australia

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Family radio

A young boy plays along with a musical game during one of the many ABC broadcasts for children. Children from around Australia tune into a kindergarten broadcast over the ABC. Tim Bowden remembers the ABC children's program <cite>The Argonauts</cite>.

From the website From Wireless to Web

Programs with Staying Power

Behind the scenes of a recording of a popular radio soap of the 1940s. Tim Bowden recalls his father listening to popular radio series <cite>Mrs Obbs</cite> and the personalities who brought the characters to life.

From the website From Wireless to Web

Representation

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Creating an Australian Image

Stuart Cunningham explains how innovations in technology have transformed television content.

From the website From Wireless to Web

The Media Machine

Electrified, digitalised then globalised, the media machine has created fantasy so spectacular that it makes the truth look badly acted.

From the website Human Contraptions

Captain Cook - The Polynesian Tupaia Joins the Endeavour Voyage

Cook takes on board an additional passenger, Polynesian priest and fellow navigator Tupaia. Tupaia shares his remarkable navigational skills, convinced that the notion of a great land mass is a European fantasy.

From the website Captain Cook

Harold Holt’s Briefcase

The disappearance of our seventeenth Prime Minister, Harold Holt, during a beach holiday sparked countless conspiracy theories. The items left in his briefcase are a significant time capsule of his last days as Prime Minister.

From the website The Prime Ministers' National Treasures

SBS

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SBS Charter

John Safran, Megan Spencer and Scott Goodings discuss the nature of programming at SBS.

From the website From Wireless to Web

Storytelling

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Tommy McRae & Mickey of Ulladulla

Working at the end of the 19th century, Aboriginal artists Tommy McRae and Mickey of Ulladulla drew the world around them with an extraordinary vitality and sensitivity to detail.

From the website Hidden Treasures

The Magic Pudding Illustrations

Norman Lindsay’s <cite>The Magic Pudding</cite> is one of our best-loved children’s books and the central character, one of our great Australian anti-heroes.

From the website National Treasures

Television news

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News as Entertainment

John Safran talks about the use of 'doorstopping' in current affairs programs. Scott Goodings traces the celebrity and entertainment value of today's news broadcasts to the 'news wars' of the late 1980s.

From the website From Wireless to Web